Published: Sat, September 15, 2018
Entertaiment | By Mabel Barber

Storm Florence prompts Trump to declare a disaster

Storm Florence prompts Trump to declare a disaster

"We've got a massive amount of cleanup to do", Saffo said.

The White House says President Donald Trump has issued a disaster declaration for North Carolina and that will make federal money available to people in the counties of Beaufort, Brunswick, Carteret, Craven, New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico and Pender.

Florence blew ashore early Friday in North Carolina with 90 miles per hour winds, buckling buildings, deluging entire communities and knocking out power to more than 900,000 homes and businesses as it crawled inland and weakened into a still-lethal tropical storm. But its progress had slowed to a crawl of 2 miles per hour.

George Pace returned to his neighborhood and saw his home for the first time, expecting the worst, but discovering only minimal damage. "We still have about 100 that want to be rescued and we have about 1,200 in the shelters", Mayor Dana Outlaw told CNN. "We got thrown into mailboxes, houses, trees", said Holt, who had stayed at home because of a doctor's appointment that was later canceled. As her son fed the goats in a hotel parking lot, she said she might not be able to return home until the middle of next week.

"It's an emergency situation". He said the cause was not drowning and did not provide further details. "They need to (stay at the hospital)".

The number of service members deployed include 7,500 from the US Coast Guard and 6,500 from the National Guard, the Federal Emergency Management Agency said. Storm surges - the bulge of ocean water pushed ashore by the hurricane - were as high as 10 feet, backing up onto rivers already swollen by almost two feet of rain.

In New Bern, North Carolina, the National Weather Service said there was 10ft of water.

Crypto's 80 Percent Price Plunge Worse Than Dot-Com Crash
That's been a disappointment for bulls, but it's good news for everyone else at a time when digital assets are tumbling. MVIS CryptoCompare Digital Assets 10 Index tool dropped even further to 80% since the all-time high in January.

"In about four days when all the water comes down from North Carolina, that's when we're going to have a problem".

National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham said radar and rain gauges indicated some areas got as much as 2 1/2 feet of rain, which he called "absolutely staggering". Authorities warned about potential landslides and numerous roads were closed. Hurricane-force winds extended 80 miles (130 kilometers) from its center, and tropical-storm-force winds reached out 195 miles (315 kilometers). "There's a little bit of apprehension as you can imagine", said Major Mark Craddock with the Salvation Army of Cape Fear, who was hunkered down with about 30 others at the organization's shelter in downtown Wilmington, about three blocks from the Cape Fear River. Floyd produced 24 inches (61 cm) of rain in some parts of North Carolina while Florence already has dumped about 30 inches (76 cm) in areas around Swansboro, North Carolina, with more on the way.

The storm's arrival brought a 105 miles per hour wind gust at the NWS office about 7 a.m. Friday, said meteorologist Jordan Baker. While unofficial, it would shatter the old record of 24 inches - set near Wilmington during Hurricane Floyd in 1999. The eye moved from sea to land at Wrightsville Beach in North Carolina.

Officials in North Myrtle Beach, where some flooding was occurring, did report some delays in their 911 emergency system, according to a news release, but their public safety personnel are still out in the community.

Mother Lesha Murphy-Johnson and her baby, Zac, were killed after being trapped inside their home in Wilmington when a tree fell onto the roof at around 9.30am on Friday.

Morehead City, North Carolina, had received 23 inches (58 centimeters) of rain by Friday night, and forecasters warned Saturday morning that parts of the Carolinas could get up to 15 inches (38 centimeters) more.

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) - Florence, now a tropical storm, swirled at a near-standstill over the Carolinas on Saturday, dumping non-stop rain over areas already flooded by seawater and swelling rivers and creeks across both states.

Like this: