Published: Fri, August 10, 2018
Research | By Jody Lindsey

Where to watch meteor shower in UAE next week


During the maximum, or peak, Sunday night and early Monday morning, it could be possible to catch as many as 110 meteors in an hour, or almost two per minute on average.

This is the largest object known to repeatedly pass by our planet.

It gets its name became the meteors appear to be coming from the constellation Perseus.

There's no need to worry about meteors raining down on you, though, as Sky and Telescope says the bright streaks of the Perseids burning up are actually about 80 miles (128,748 meters) above your head and created by pieces of space debris about the size of a small pebble.

The Perseid Meteor Shower takes place every year, and promises a spectacular display in the sky.

From Aug.11-13, the Perseid meteor shower will send between 60 and 70 meteors shooting across the sky every hour. In those cases they can actually predict that when the Earth passes through the orbital path of the comet there will be a higher than average debris field.

"It will be a crescent, which means it will set before the Perseid show gets underway after midnight", NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke told Space.com.

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Every August there is an opportunity to see meteor showers and this weekend is your chance for 2018.

To make the best of the meteors, observers should avoid built-up areas and try to find an unobstructed view to the east.

This year there will be favourable viewing conditions. For these extra sparkly Perseid years, you can thank one of our obtrusive cosmic neighbors: Jupiter.

According to Jolene Creighton at Quarks to Quasars, the meteors you'll be able to see during the meteor shower's peak each hour will be blasting into Earth's atmosphere at speeds of around 209,000 kilometres per hour (130,000 miles per hour).

The good news is you will be able to see them with the naked eye.

If you want to catch a glimpse of the Perseid meteor shower, then it's worth finding a dark location; light pollution will inhibit your view of the meteor shower. When the Earth's orbit crosses a trail of these particles they can collide with our atmosphere and burn up as shooting stars.

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