Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
People | By Leon Thompson

May defuses revolt in parliament over Brexit plans

May defuses revolt in parliament over Brexit plans

The government has promised MPs a vote on the final Brexit deal, but initially said it would be a simple "take it or leave it" choice. The two sides aren't yet clear exactly on the terms of their deal, but it looks likely that Parliament will emerge with a greater say in the process. That supposedly, according to BBC's Political Editor Laura Kuenssberg, drew a colorful response from a pro-EU Tory rebel: "If she f**ks us, she's f**ked".

In a highly charged atmosphere in parliament, lawmakers who oppose the government said they had received death threats and brandished a copy of one of Britain's tabloid newspapers, the Daily Express, which ran a headline saying: "Ignore the will of the people at your peril".

The government has accepted one of the Lords amendments, allowing the United Kingdom to continue to co-operate with European Union agencies, which it says is already its policy.

MPs are to debate her government's plans for future customs relations with the European Union.

Grieve told MPs: "If we don't achieve a deal at all, the fact is we are going to be facing an enormous crisis".

There's no time to get the wording of the compromise text wrong because it will probably be debated and voted on in the House of Lords on Monday, according to one senior government official.

As Tory rebels threatened to defy the whip and back the Lords' amendment, .

MPs said they were offered, in a last-minute concession, real "input" if no deal with the European Union was done by December.

Just three hours later, ministers caved in. She tore into the deep division and animosity which she warned is tearing her party, and the country, apart.

France's Macron seeks to forge European front against Trump
They include the US trade war with Europe, climate change, relations with Iran and the Israel-Palestinian conflict. Of course, as usual, Trump had his facts wrong - it was the Brits who burned the White House.

May urged Conservative lawmakers to back the government and show "that we are united as a party in our determination to deliver on the decision made by the British people".

"What it does is put in place a structure if things do go as planned", she said. The strength of this commitment is yet to be seen in writing - and the Brexit department is still insisting it has not given up control of the negotiations - but the anti-Brexit rebels showed they have the numbers to force a defeat should the government renege on its pledge.

"I trust the prime minister".

Under the proposal, if no deal has been reached with Brussels by this point, the government will return to the House of Commons to determine the next course of action.

During a frantic day of discussions between ministers and Conservative backbenchers, potential rebels were eventually persuaded to back down when Solicitor General Robert Buckland told MPs that ministers were willing to "engage positively" with their concerns. May's been resisting the demand because she doesn't want her hands to be tied during the talks.

Earlier, Mrs May was hit by the resignation of justice minister Phillip Lee, who quit the Government live on stage during a speech in London in order to be able to back Mr Grieve's amendment.

They also voted to disagree with Lords amendment 37, which was part of an attempt to remove the exit day from the Bill and allow the Commons to rethink its approach.

Conservative Brexit campaigners accused those in the party who indicated they would vote against the government of not respecting the referendum result.

Like this: