Published: Wed, May 16, 2018
Industry | By Terrell Bush

Apple Macbook Pro Keyboard Defect Lawsuit Investigation

Apple Macbook Pro Keyboard Defect Lawsuit Investigation

In early May 2018, Apple customers started a change.org petition requesting that Apple institute a recall of its defective laptops, noting "Apple's relative silence on this issue". The lawsuit also takes issue with Apple's repair process for faulty keyboards, saying it doesn't permanently fix problems during the repair process. Both plaintiffs experienced key failures a short time after purchasing them, and allege that Apple knew of the problem, but continued to use them in future models of their laptops.

Apple's butterfly keyboard and MacBook are produced and assembled in such a way that when minimal amounts of dust or debris accumulate under or around a key, keystrokes fail to register.

"Owners of these laptops have reported a potential defect, which causes keys on the keyboard to become unresponsive, necessitating complete replacement of the keyboard", the firm writes on its website. The keyboard defect compromises the MacBook's core functionality.

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According to the proposed class, "all persons within the United States who purchased, other than for resale, a model year 2015 or later Apple MacBook, or a model year 2016 or later MacBook Pro laptop, equipped with a "butterfly" keyboard" are invited to the party.

Mac Rumors has the details on Apple's new legal trouble. They also added that the 2017 model of the MacBook Pro is fairing slightly better, "but not by a lot".

It has now been over three years since Apple first introduced its butterfly keyboard with the 12-inch MacBook, later bringing it to the MacBook Pro line - but user sentiment seems to be growing increasingly negative. At the end of the day, most of the things that you need to do on an iPad will work on the standard model.

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